Tag Archives: Cathy McKim

In memoriam: Ed Rosing

A lovely tribute to a talented theatre artist. Bon voyage, Ed.

life with more cowbell

SAMSUNG Ed Rosing – during a break in scenic painting on The Lady’s Not For Burning at Alumnae Theatre

Ed Rosing

March 11, 1929 – September 12, 2016

Ed Rosing (aka Eddie, Eduardo) was a creative soul with a quick, sharp wit, and a great love of classical music, opera and theatre. He played piano, was an original founding member of Cabbagetown Theatre, and worked as a respected interior decorator (into his late 80s, he still had two clients!), as well as a theatre set and lighting designer, scenic artist and director.

2013-12-30-16-01-05 Ed and Cody Boyd, working on the lighting for The Lady’s Not For Burning at Alumnae Theatre

I met Ed at Alumnae Theatre and got to know him during a production of Lady Windermere’s Fan, where he was the lighting designer and I was playing Cecil Graham. His gorgeous lighting plot included a gradual sunset during the opening scenes…

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September 19, 2016 · 3:34 pm

Photo shoot with Lisa MacIntosh

Former bloggergal for Alumnae Theatre, Cathy McKim (also a scenic artist, most recently for The Lady’s Not For Burning in January; AND an actor – Wit and Lady Windermere’s Fan, among others) had a photo shoot in the Studio.

life with more cowbell

Had so much fun on Saturday, spending the early afternoon with photographer Lisa MacIntosh and makeup artist Rebecca Kupferstein up in the Studio at Alumnae Theatre for my white tie and tails vintage photo shoot.

Inspired by Lisa’s shoot with actress Kate Drummond, who sported a fab vintage look, as well as my experience playing Cecil Graham in Alumnae’s production of Oscar Wilde’s Lady Windermere’s Fan several years ago, I decided to go with a period look as a male impersonator, in white tie and tails. For the makeup, we were inspired by Julie Andrews as Victor in Victor/Victoria.

Here are some select pics from the shoot. Thanks so much to Lisa and Rebecca for their beautiful work!

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April 15, 2014 · 11:15 pm

A world on a stage – scenic work on The Lady’s Not For Burning @ Alumnae Theatre

Scenic artist Cathy McKim’s slideshow: a fascinating look at The Lady’s Not For Burning set painting in progress.  It takes a village to make a production, for sure!  The shot of the cast & director sitting onstage was taken at the post-matinee Talkback on February 2.

life with more cowbell

Hey all –

As promised, here’s the slideshow extravaganza of the work for my recent scenic artist gig on Alumnae Theatre’s production of The Lady’s Not For Burning (designed by Ed Rosing).

Shouts to:

Building crew: Master carpenter Mike Peck, with additional construction by Cody Boyd, Paul Cotton, Gord Peck, Ed Rosing and Mike Vitorovitch.

Painting crew: Scenic artist (me), with Cody Boyd, Razie Brownstone, Joan Burrows, Margot Devlin, Ed Rosing and Dorothy Wilson.

The Lady’s Not For Burning is in its final week on the Alumnae mainstage, running tonight (Wed, Feb 5) through Saturday, February 8 at 8:00 p.m.

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February 5, 2014 · 4:28 pm

“The Lady’s Not For Burning” Talkback, Feb 2

Lady's Not For Burning cast

Cast of “The Lady’s Not For Burning”. BACK ROW:
Chris Coculuzzi (Thomas), Ian Orr (Matthew Skipps), Christopher Kelk (Mayor Tyson), Rob Candy (Tappercoom), Paul Cotton (Humphrey), Chris Whidden (Richard).
FRONT ROW: Andrea Brown (Jennet), Elsbeth McCall (Alizon), Carol McLennan (Margaret), Peter Higginson (The Chaplain).
NOT PICTURED: Ryan Armstrong (Nicholas).  Photo:  Dahlia Katz

As is traditional on the second Sunday of the run, yesterday’s matinee of The Lady’s Not For Burning was followed by a Talkback.  About a third of the audience stuck around for an informative Q&A with director Jane Carnwath, sound designer Angus Barlow, set & lighting designer Ed Rosing, and of course the cast.  Costume designer Margaret Spence was unfortunately not able to make it.  The Q&A was hosted by one of the producers, Barbara Larose.  Scenic artist Cathy McKim took pictures of the set which will soon go up on her blog as a slideshow, and of course I will re-blog for Alumnae.  Following is a sort-of transcript of the questions and answers during the approx 30-minute Talkback.

 Q:           It’s mentioned in the press release that Jane has loved The Lady for a long time.  Can you tell us why?

A:            Director JANE CARNWATH – It was instinctive – before I knew better!  I heard the recording of the original production – 1949?  1950?  [according to my research it was actually 1948 – bloggergal] which starred John Gielguid as Thomas and Pamela Brown as Jennet, and fell in love with the language.  At first I wanted to play Jennet, and then as time went on and that became unlikely, I wanted to play Margaret [the mayor’s sister, mother of Humphrey and Nicholas].  And then when that didn’t happen, I decided I wanted to direct it. Why do I love it?  I love the themes of hope and the possibility of redemption, and I love the characters.

Q:           The language shifted from almost Shakespearean to modern.  Was that in the script?

A:            Director JANE CARNWATH – Yes.  Christopher Fry wrote the play just after World War II, and the language is full of intentional anachronisms.  Fry states that the period is 1400, “either more or less or exactly” – he’s not very concerned about it.  We decided to just do a tip of the hat to the period, and not worry about exact period accuracy.

Q:           There are a lot of doors and exits – was that specified in the script, or a production decision?

A:            Set Designer ED ROSING –  It was necessary!  People are constantly going and coming through doors and windows.  The concept for the set was a house built around a stone room, like a church.  That’s why you’ll see the walls are stone on the inside.  In those days, fabric was used as insulation – we went a step further and put fabric on the walls.  The set in the original production was very Gothic – church-like with lots of arches.  I never forgot that original, but wanted this set to be much more humble and down-to-earth.        [bloggergal’s note:  in the original 1948 production in London’s West End, a then-unknown Richard Burton played Richard, the mayor’s clerk!]         

 Q:           To the actors, what was it like, working with this text?

A:            CHRIS COCULUZZI (Thomas) – I’ve done a lot of Shakespeare over the last 20 years.  This was more challenging!   Maybe because Fry’s language is not so much a part of our culture and consciousness as Shakespeare’s is.

A:            CAROL McLENNAN (Margaret) – They key for me was I found it was essential to e-nun-ci-ate!  You can’t just garble it all together – it has to be understandable to the audience when they hear it for the first time.  Even now we’re still finding things. When I first read for Jane, she said “You were very natural – this play isn’t.”

A:            PAUL COTTON (Humphrey) – Jane insisted we get the language down first, then work on making it natural after.  Which is a reversal of the usual process.

A:            ANDREA BROWN (Jennet) – It’s a journey and a quest with every performance!  The challenge was how to honour the beautiful and poetic language while making it engaging to the audience.

Q:           The cast did a great job in getting the comedy across.

A:            IAN ORR (Matthew Skipps) – This is a comedy??!!

Q:           I noticed in her bio that Andrea has now played an accused witch in two shows.

A:            ANDREA BROWN – Yes, I played Elizabeth Proctor in The Crucible just a few months ago.  Spoiler alert: it does not end well for her!  Jennet has a much happier ending.

Q:           (Jane calls the audience’s attention to the sound design)

A:            Sound Designer ANGUS BARLOW – There are about 25 sound cues.  Some are so subtle, it’s like Margot [stage manager Margot Devlin] calls the cue and nothing happens.  We can’t hear it in the booth, but it’s audible to the audience.  It was a challenge to build and run the sound.  We recorded some of the cast to make the noises of the angry mob and the party, and a professional cellist was brought in to record the awful sounds of the viol tuning [actor Peter Higginson, who plays the musically untalented Chaplain, interjects: “it wasn’t me!”].

Q:           It’s a big cast [11 actors] – was everybody at all the rehearsals?

A:            Director JANE CARNWATH – No, we had a few reads all together and then I broke the script into scenes and tried to bring actors in only when they would be used.   When we finally get to run all the scenes together it takes a huge leap forward.  This was one of the best teams I’ve ever worked with – a lot happened onstage; the actors made it come together.  I had a great time with the production because I was also working with people I’ve worked with before – Ed, Angus, Margaret, Margot… it’s been wonderful.

The Lady’s Not For Burning runs to Saturday Feb 8.  Four more performances:  Wed – Sat at 8pm.  Tickets are 2-for-1 on Wed, and $20 Thu – Sat (unless you purchase day-of tickets at half price at the T.O. Tix booth!).  reservations@alumnaetheatre.com

 

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Fly on the wall at “The Lady’s Not For Burning” rehearsal

This coming weekend, the cast & crew of The Lady’s Not For Burning swing into Tech.   Usually, designers, operators and crew work out the technical cues under the leadership of the stage manager on Saturday, and Sunday is the Cue-to-Cue rehearsal with actors.  “To lessen the pain”, as SM Margot Devlin says, the producers (Barbara Larose, Ellen Green) will provide lunch for everyone.

I sat in for a piece of last Saturday’s rehearsal (Jan 4), just to see how it’s going.  In a big group scene from near the beginning of the play, Thomas the ex-soldier (Chris Coculuzzi) is trying to convince the villagers that he’s murdered people and should be hanged – “What about my murders?”, he keeps asking.  Only to be continually dismissed by the town’s Mayor Tyson (Christopher Kelk):  “It will all be gone into at the proper time.”  The mayor is somewhat harried because at the same time,  a local girl, Jennet (Andrea Irwin Brown) is accused of witchcraft and turning a man into a dog.  Stage Manager Margot read in for absent actor Chris Whidden, who plays Richard, the mayor’s clerk.  [For those keeping count, there are 3 actors named Chris/Christopher in this production, plus the playwright Christopher Fry!]

I also saw a run of a scene near the end of the play, featuring the entire cast: everyone from the earlier scene – including  Carol McLennan as the Mayor’s sister Margaret;  Ryan Armstrong and Paul Cotton as her  sons; Elsbeth McCall as Alizon, the girl they both want;  and Peter Higginson as the guitar-toting* Chaplain – plus the magistrate Tappercoom (Rob Candy),  and Ian Orr having a grand ol’ time as the drunken rag & bone man Matthew Skipps.  “Aren’t you dead?” asks Thomas.  “You’ve been dead for hours.”

After the scene runs, director Jane Carnwath gave notes to the actors.  Was intrigued to notice the start of a medieval village backdrop, which scenic artist Cathy McKim (who will be creating stone, wood and stucco finishes, and of course using the “magical” colour of burnt umber) reports will be the last thing painted.

Here’s her initial sketch presented to set designer Ed Rosing – it’s from November, so things may have changed: Lady's Not For Burning bkdrop sketch     *I was curious about the guitar that the Chaplain (Peter Higginson) carried.  So I asked him about it.  Here’s his delightfully tongue-in-cheek e-mail response.

BLOGGERGAL:  Hey, do you actually play the guitar you were carrying in Lady?

PETER:   Regrettably, no – I don’t play guitar – though that prop I might be able to manage as a percussion tool as it has no strings!! The Chaplain can only play religious dirges with any accomplishment and, I am assured, will never have to pluck or bow the strings on stage – the paucity of his (my) talent will be represented by discordant sounds through the magic of those that deal with the complexities of producing the audio fabric for this mysterious but magical play – but also, please note, the instrument is more likely to resemble a viola than a guitar.

Audiences will have the opportunity to see the whole thing come together on Alumnae Theatre’s Mainstage as of January 24, where it runs to February 8.  Tickets can be purchased online via our website www.alumnaetheatre.com, or you can reserve seats by phone (416-364-4170 xtn 1) or email  reservations@alumnaetheatre.com and pay cash on arrival.  Showtimes:  8pm Wed – Sat; 2pm Sun.  Tickets are $20 Thu – Sat; 2-for-1 on Wednesdays; and PWYC for Sunday matinees.  No service charge on cash sales at Box Office.  Feeling spontaneous?  Spin by the T.O. Tix booth in Yonge/Dundas Square on a Thursday, Friday or Saturday, and pick up half-price same-day tickets (+ service charge).

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Filed under 2013/14 Season, The Lady's Not For Burning

Ah, you hi-jinks “Così” guys / graffiti a go-go

I love getting submissions for this blog.  Have mentioned several times to the cast and crew of Così that they should send me any thoughts, anecdotes about funny incidents in rehearsal, etc.  The delightful James Warner, who plays drug-addled Zac, has risen to the challenge once again (see previous post about his nipples and accordion…)  Here’s what he sent me this time:

 After break time last night, I came back into the theatre with my shirt completely undone, and, trying to get a laugh (not that I ever do that), loudly announced to all present: “Well, I suppose I have to put some clothes back on”.  At which point poor Margot [stage manager Margot Devlin] scuttled over and started frantically covering up my body. She’s such a nice lady – and an example to us all.

It should be noted that costume designer Margaret Spence has garbed James in one of those 1970’s shirts open to the navel  (I have just learned the term “man cleavage”!) and accessorized with a big medallion – that’s when he’s not wearing lederhosen for the opera scenes.  Last night the cast donned costumes for a photo shoot with Dahlia Katz (www.dahliakatz.com) – the results soon to be posted on Alumnae Theatre’s website.

In other news, set designer Ed Rosing and scenic painter Cathy McKim have now added genuine Australian graffiti from the period (early 1970’s) on the theatre walls.  Slogans like “Nuclear families have fallout”, “Dick Nixon before he dicks you”, and my favourite, “Real punks can’t spell capocino”!  And this morning, Cathy tweeted:  “A disco ball & a smoke machine. Coming soon to the @alumnaetheatre main stage. The Così set design plot thickens…”  One of her Twitter followers commented:  “that’s an instant party, right there.”

We’re doing a rough run of the whole show tonight.  Opening two weeks from tomorrow – on Friday the 13th!    No friggatriskaidekaphobia here, nope.

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Filed under 2011/12 season, Cosi