Tag Archives: Oscar Wilde

Meet the cast of “A Woman of No Importance” – part 5

More responses are coming in!  Today we hear from Amy Zuch and Paula Schultz.

Q #1:      Who do you play in A Woman of No Importance?  Tell us a little about your character.

AMY ZUCH:  I play Lady Stutfield. I tell my friends that if the ladies of WONI were the Golden Girls, she would be Rose.  A bit naive.
PAULA SCHULTZ:  I play Mrs. Allonby, a flirtatious and witty woman who enjoys male attention, a suggestive joke, and a stiff drink, not necessarily in that order.

Q #2:      Director Paul Hardy has changed the setting of the play from the 1890’s (which is when Oscar Wilde wrote it) to the 1980’s.  What surprised you about making the time switch?  Did you discover issues or social mores that were surprisingly similar (or not) almost 100 years apart?

AMY ZUCH: I love the 80’s so it’s been very fun to experience. If you think back to all the classic 80’s movies, class actually was a reoccurring theme. There was always the preppy kids, or the poor kid who wanted to get in with the “it” crowd that was always rich. Pretty in Pink, Some Kind of Wonderful… movies like that, but maybe not those specific movies. I can’t remember. The 80’s were a while ago.
[Ed note:  yes, about 30 years.  Love the crimped hair, Amy!]

PAULA SCHULTZ:   it certainly got me thinking about the complexities of feminism throughout the ages.  The post-dinner scene in which the women discuss their differing views on men and relationships and sex and power, certainly feels like it could happen in a contemporary context.

Q #3:      Can you relate any anecdotes from rehearsal (e.g : another actor – in character or out – doing something unexpected)?

AMY ZUCH:   I’m still a fan of grey sweater day.  Paula [Paula Schultz, as Mrs. Allonby], Gillian [Gillian English as Lady Caroline] and I all showed up at rehearsal wearing pretty much the same sweater.

Gillian English (Lady Caroline Pontefract), Paula Schultz (Mrs. Allonby) and Amy Zuch (Lady Stutfield) are colour-coordinated at rehearsal for "A Woman of No Importance".  Photo by ASM Neena Ahmad.

Gillian English (Lady Caroline Pontefract), Paula Schultz (Mrs. Allonby) and Amy Zuch (Lady Stutfield) are colour-coordinated at rehearsal for “A Woman of No Importance”. Photo by ASM Neena Ahmad.

PAULA SCHULTZ:  Well, Mr Kelvil (the wonderful James Graham) made a spectacular entrance during one rehearsal that none of us will soon forget.  Let’s just say he was drunk.  Very drunk.  His character, I mean.  Not James.

[Ed  note:  Hmmm.  This is the second mention of James’  entrance – Gillian English described it as “committed”.  Now I’m curious to hear what James himself intended!]

Q #4:      Do you have a favourite line or moment from the play – yours or anyone else’s?

AMY ZUCH:  I love Lady Hunstanton’s [Andy Fraser] lines that call out Illingworth’s nonsense talk. And that the audience is with her. She puts herself down, like it’s her fault that she doesn’t understand, but everyone knows it’s just that Illingworth [Andrew Batten] is full of it.

[Ed note:  sorry, Andrew – looks like nobody’s buying your character analysis that Illingworth is “humble, self-effacing, warm, kind…” ]

PAULA SCHULTZ:  One of my favourite lines belongs to Lady Hunstanton (the fabulous Andy Fraser):  “No, dear, he was killed in the hunting field. Or was it fishing, Caroline?”

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A Woman of No Importance runs until Feb 9.  Don’t forget:  following this Sunday’s matinee (Feb 3), there will be a Talkback with cast, director, and maybe some designers.  Tickets are PWYC.

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Meet the cast of “A Woman of No Importance” – part 4

Lady Caroline speaks!  Gillian English weighs in with her character’s view on  marriage, 1980’s morals, and the infamous gold pleather pants.

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Lady Caroline Pontefract (Gillian English) and her friend Lady Hunstanton (Andy Fraser) in "A Woman of No Importance".  Alumnae Theatre Company, Jan 25 - Feb 9, 2013.  Photo: Bruce Peters

Lady Caroline Pontefract (Gillian English) and her friend Lady Hunstanton (Andy Fraser) in “A Woman of No Importance”. Alumnae Theatre Company, Jan 25 – Feb 9, 2013. Photo: Bruce Peters

Q #1:      Who do you play in A Woman of No Importance?  Tell us a little about your character.

GILLIAN ENGLISH:  I play Lady Caroline Pontefract, Lady Hunstanton’s [Andy Fraser] best friend. She’s very quick, very witty and incredibly sure of her position in society. However, she is on her 4th marriage, and all of her bad luck in love seems to have made the poor dear insecure. Although, with the way Sir John [Michael Vitorovich] behaves, it’s not unwarranted.

Q #2:      Director Paul Hardy has changed the setting of the play from the 1890’s (which is when Oscar Wilde wrote it) to the 1980’s.  What surprised you about making the time switch?  Did you discover issues or social mores that were surprisingly similar (or not) almost 100 years apart?

GILLIAN ENGLISH:   Lady Caroline fits in perfectly in the 1980s. It doesn’t matter if the rest of society has grown past certain social issues that would have been taboo in the 1890s; everything is a big deal to Lady Caroline. If everyone became moral and good, there’d be nothing to gossip about.

Q #3:      Can you relate any anecdotes from rehearsal (e.g: : another actor – in character or out – doing something unexpected)?

GILLIAN ENGLISH:    During one of our final rehearsals before we opened, James [James Graham, as the politician Mr. Kelvil – or “Mr. Kettle”, as Lady Caroline insists on referring to him] and Amy [Amy Zuch, as flirty/ditzy Lady Stutfield] really committed to their Act 3 entrance and James fell headlong onto the stage. I’m very glad I was offstage for that occurrence. Jason Thompson [who plays Archdeacon Daubeny] never makes a weak choice, so it’s never a wise idea to look him straight in the eye on stage, because you will corpse**; or at least I will, I don’t know you.

We always warm up as a group before a run, and once we did an exercise with some deep knee bends. By the time places were called, I was completely stuck to the inside of my pleather pants. It was a very uncomfortable first act.  Speaking of those pants, I can’t actually move when I sit down on the set chairs, because the pleather sticks to the plastic. If I have to pivot or move, I have to actually pick my butt up and swing it around. It’s very feminine.
Q #4:      Do you have a favourite line or moment from the play – yours or anyone else’s?

GILLIAN ENGLISH:   I love when Gerald [played by Nicholas Porteous] says “Hello mother!” at the end of Act 4, it’s adorable. And Mrs. Allonby’s [Paula Schultz] exchange about Patagonia is hilarious, especially because she’s so drunk. And, Mrs. Arbuthnot’s [Áine Magennis] unintentional Brandy and Monica reference when she says “The boy is mine” in Act 2.

**”to corpse”:  theatre lingo for busting out in inappropriate mirth.

Blame costume designer Brandon Kleiman for the pleather pants.

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Meet the cast of “A Woman of No Importance” – part 3, + review

A Woman of No Importance enjoyed a bang-up opening weekend, with near-sold out, enthusiastic houses.  I had a chance to chat with cast member Kathleen Pollard at the post-show reception on opening night, and urged her to respond to the questions I sent the cast a couple of weeks ago.   So here are her answers.

Archdeacon Daubeny (Jason Thompson- far right) expounds about his saintly wife to anyone who will listen - Farquhar the butler (Daniel Staseff, left), Frances the maid (Kathleen Pollard), and Lady Hunstanton (Andy Fraser):  "Her deafness is a great privation to her. She can't even hear my sermons now."Photo: Bruce Peters

Archdeacon Daubeny (Jason Thompson- far right) expounds about his saintly wife to anyone who will listen – Farquhar the butler (Daniel Staseff, left), Frances the maid (Kathleen Pollard), and Lady Hunstanton (Andy Fraser): “Her deafness is a great privation to her. She can’t even hear my sermons now.”
Photo: Bruce Peters

Q#1:      Who do you play in A Woman of No Importance?  Tell us a little about your character.

KATHLEEN POLLARD:  I play two characters in the show:  the first is a pretentious maid named Frances – servant to Lady Hunstanton; and the second is a shy tenant of Mrs. Arbuthnot’s house – who also essentially acts as her servant.

Q#2:      Director Paul Hardy has changed the setting of the play from the 1890’s (which is when Oscar Wilde wrote it) to the 1980’s.  What surprised you about making the time switch?  Did you discover issues or social mores that were surprisingly similar (or not) almost 100 years apart?  

KATHLEEN POLLARD:  I was surprised at first when Paul announced his intention to change the setting…but I’ve been totally amazed at how timely the play really feels.  Paul made some strategic cuts to the script, and the way the dialogue flows between the characters feels very modern and I think it lends itself well to the new setting.  Gender biases and the social expectations of men and women haven’t changed that much, it would seem. The actors have also done a tremendous job of finding a rhythm to their way of speaking, which also really brings out the humour.

Q#3:      Can you relate any anecdotes from rehearsal (e.g. : another actor – in character or out – doing something unexpected)?

KATHLEEN POLLARD:  Hmm, well…an embarrassing moment for me happened during a run of the show in our last week of rehearsal before opening night.  We were deep into the run, and partway through Act 4, when suddenly my cellphone alarm started going off.  The phone was in my jacket pocket, which I’d left in the audience seating…and even though the ringer was on silent, the alarm went off at full volume.  The thing is, my alarm ringtone is set to a dog barking.  So for the first minute or so, Paul, Margot [stage manager Margot Devlin] and Angus [sound designer Angus Barlow] are looking around wondering whose dog is outside the theatre and why it won’t shut up.  Then gradually it dawns on them that this “dog” has an awfully mechanical way of barking, and realized that someone, somewhere, had let their phone go off.  I couldn’t hear it backstage, and there was about 7 or 8 minutes left of the show, so everyone soldiered on.  But I certainly had to face the music once we finished the run.

Q#4:      Do you have a favourite line or moment from the play – yours or anyone else’s?

KATHLEEN POLLARD:  There are so many witty lines spoken throughout the play.  My characters only have about 4 lines between them…but I think one of my favourite lines is Lady Hunstanton’s:  “He died almost immediately of joy…or gout; I forget which.”.

Kathleen also filled me in on a little tidbit about Gillian English’s  costume: the gold pleather pants that Lady Caroline Pontefract wears (Lady C  apparently shares the wacky fashion sense of Eddie [Jennifer Saunders] in the Britcom Absolutely Fabulous)  are very noisy to walk in.  So Gillian has to carefully position her legs apart, or the pants will squeak!

The production has already garnered a couple of excellent reviews – see FAB’s at  http://www.fabmagazine.com/fab-blog/next-gay-theatre-review-a-woman-of-no-importance and Life With More Cowebell’s at http://lifewithmorecowbell.wordpress.com/2013/01/28/a-woman-of-no-importance-time-travels-to-1985-alumnae-theatre/

A Woman of No Importance runs to Feb 9 – see http://www.alumnaetheatre.com/1213woman.html  for showtimes and reservation info.  You can purchase tickets online in advance (Thu – Sat shows only) at www.totix.ca  Day-of discounts are available in person at T.O. Tix booth in Yonge-Dundas Square.

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Meet the cast of “A Woman of No Importance” – part 1

Alumnae Theatre Company’s production of Oscar Wilde’s social satire A Woman of No Importance opens on Friday, January 25.  To get audiences somewhat up to speed, I posed a few questions to the cast.  Here’s the first installment – more to follow, as they submit their responses.

What's a little intrigue between friends? Our upper class of characters bandy politics and morals.  L-R:  Lord Illingworth (Andrew Batten), Mrs. Allonby (Paula Schultz), Lady Caroline Pontrefact (Gillian English, in back row), Sir John Pontefract (Michael Vitorovich), Mrs. Arbuthnot (Áine Magennis), Lady Hunstanton (Andy Fraser, in back row), Lady Stutfield (Amy Zuch, in pink jacket), Mr. Kelvil (James Graham), Farquhar the butler (Daniel Staseff, with tray), Frances the maid (Kathleen Pollard), Archdeacon Daubeny (Jason Thompson), and in FRONT ROW: Gerald Arbuthnot (Nicholas Porteous), Miss Hester Worsley (Sophia Fabiili).

What’s a little intrigue between friends? Our upper class of characters bandy politics and morals. L-R: Lord Illingworth (Andrew Batten), Mrs. Allonby (Paula Schultz), Lady Caroline Pontefract (Gillian English, in back row), Sir John Pontefract (Michael Vitorovich), Mrs. Arbuthnot (Áine Magennis), Lady Hunstanton (Andy Fraser, in back row), Lady Stutfield (Amy Zuch, in pink jacket), Mr. Kelvil (James Graham), Farquhar the butler (Daniel Staseff, with tray), Frances the maid (Kathleen Pollard), Archdeacon Daubeny (Jason Thompson), and in FRONT ROW: Gerald Arbuthnot (Nicholas Porteous), Miss Hester Worsley (Sophia Fabiilli).

Q #1:     Who do you play in A Woman of No Importance?  Tell us a little about your character.

Lord Illingworth (Andrew Batten) flirts with his favourite sparring partner, Mrs. Allonby (Paula Schultz):  "Nothing spoils a romance so much as a sense of humour in the woman."

Lord Illingworth (Andrew Batten) flirts with his favourite sparring partner, Mrs. Allonby (Paula Schultz): “Nothing spoils a romance so much as a sense of humour in the woman.”

ANDREW BATTEN:  I play Lord Illingworth, who I think is really the hero of the whole piece.  Humble, self-effacing, warm, kind – he’s really a remarkable guy.  Some of the other actors seem a bit confused about his character – words like “lech”, “misogynist” and “icky” have been used.  I’m not exactly sure where they’re coming from, but we’re all professionals and I’m sure all the misunderstandings will be ironed out by opening night.

ANDY FRASER:  I play Lady Hunstanton – she thinks of herself not as shallow (see question #4), but as “very practical – and terribly helpful!”

NICHOLAS PORTEOUS:  I play Gerald Arbuthnot.  At first he appears to be a simple, fresh-faced and hopeful young lad with a spring in his step and a song in his heart.  As the play continues, he’s forced to question his most fundamental values. He starts off very Disney and becomes something much more complicated.

Q #2:     Director Paul Hardy has changed the period setting of the play from the 1890’s (which is when Oscar Wilde wrote it) to the 1980’s.  What surprised you about making the time switch?  Did you discover issues or social mores that were surprisingly similar (or not) almost 100 years apart?

ANDREW BATTEN:  I’m surprised by the continued relevance of Elton John’s music.  Apparently Elton wrote the original version of “Tiny Dancer” in 1891, but it was still very popular throughout the 1980’s.  I’ve heard a rumour that the secret to Sir Elton’s eternal life was the sale of his soul to Disney Corp., but I don’t know any of the details.

Q #3:     Can you relate any anecdotes from rehearsal (e.g: : another actor – in character or out – doing something unexpected)?

ANDREW BATTEN: No-one ever really knows what Jason [Jason Thompson, who plays Archdeacon Daubeny] is going to do.  He puts the bold in bold choices.  I wouldn’t be surprised to see him do the entire show with a raw turkey on his head.

NICHOLAS PORTEOUS:  For one run Paul gave Jason a note to play his character Dr. Daubeny a bit more drug-addled. He ran with it so hard that every character in the room appeared almost as high and delighted as he was. The spontaneous mirror-exercise with Lady Hunstanton was the “high”light.

Archdeacon Daubeny (Jason Thompson- far right) expounds about his saintly wife to anyone who will listen - Farquhar the butler (Daniel Staseff, left), Frances the maid (Kathleen Pollard), and Lady Hunstanton (Andy Fraser):  "Her deafness is a great privation to her. She can't even hear my sermons now."Photo: Bruce Peters

Archdeacon Daubeny (Jason Thompson- far right) expounds about his saintly wife to anyone who will listen – Farquhar the butler (Daniel Staseff, left), Frances the maid (Kathleen Pollard), and Lady Hunstanton (Andy Fraser): “Her deafness is a great privation to her. She can’t even hear my sermons now.”
Photo: Bruce Peters

Q #4:     Do you have a favourite line or moment from the play – yours or anyone else’s?

ANDREW BATTEN:  I really like Nic’s [Nicholas Porteous, playing Gerald Arbuthnot, son of the “Woman” of the play title] line “You know I love Hester Worsley.  Who could help loving her?” just because every time he says it Sophia [Sophia Fabiilli, as Hester] floats a few inches higher off the floor.  Also, I like every time someone says something nice about Lord Illingworth because it makes me feel like they’re finally figuring the character out (see response to question #1).

ANDY FRASER:   My favourite line (my own) is “My dear young lady, there was a great deal of truth, I dare say, in what you said, and you looked very pretty while you said it, which is much more important.”

NICHOLAS PORTEOUS:   I have to give a shout-out to “He picked up the cudgel for that pretty prude with wonderful promptitude.” Half of the amazingness of this line is that it doesn’t even need to be interesting. It shows how unstoppably clever Lord Illingworth is, even when describing his own embarrassing scandals. He can’t help it.

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Hmmm.  Since two of his castmates have now mentioned him,  doesn’t that make you curious to see just what exactly the notorious Jason Thompson gets up to onstage? Let’s hope we hear from the man himself next!  And don’t forget to reserve tickets: reservations@alumnaetheatre.com

 

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“A Woman of No Importance” – the first read

Last night (Nov 6), Alumnae Theatre’s Main Stage, just vacated by the Toronto Irish Players, was crammed with actors crowded around tables set up in a square.  I think there were 13, but may have lost count.  It was the first read-through of Oscar Wilde’s A Woman of No Importance, which will run January 25 – February 9, 2013.

Also present for the read were producer Kathryn Binnersley (who provided yummy snacks) , executive producer Ramona Baillie, stage manager Margot Devlin, sound designer Angus Barlow, dialect coach John Fleming (who had to leave at 8pm to go to the Studio for a Drowning Girls rehearsal – he’s also dialect coach for that production, which opens Nov 16), assistant stage manager Sangeeta Wylie (who read the stage directions), and wardrobe supervisor Julie Da Costa (who answered an ad on Craigslist…).

Director Paul Hardytold the cast that he wants to make this classic play – centred around a gathering of upper-class society folk, and first performed in 1893 – relevant to modern audiences.  Instead of keeping the time period in the 1890’s, he’s transposing it to the 1980’s!  Think shoulder pads and big hair.

1980s fashion – oh, no!

Costume designer Brandon Kleiman (unfortunately not present) will have his work cut out for him.  Yes, it will still take place in England.  Paul joked that he had briefly considered setting it in the Muskokas, but decided that wouldn’t work!  The newer time period means that actors can be freer and looser in their body postures, and not have to worry so much about keeping a “classical” stance.  Accents will also be mellower for some characters; less upper-crust RP.

Realizing that the change in period means some of the dialogue won’t work.  Paul has already done some cutting, and plans to do more with the actors’ input in early rehearsals.  But it’s quite humbling to realize how little really needs to be changed.  For example, the “East End problem” that stuffy politician Mr. Kelvil mentions still exists in present-day London.

The script is divided into four Acts, but we will play it as two, with a break between Acts Two and Three.  The reading ran for 55 minutes each half.  Paul suggested that the actors treat it like a dinner party, peopled with smart, interesting, fully fleshed-out and real characters engaged in constant intrigue.  He was delighted with the performances tonight, finding that they pointed out even more depth in the script than he had noticed on the page.  “Your thoughts?” he asked the cast.  Jason Thompson (who gave a hilarious read as the holier-than-thou Archdeacon Daubeny) responded, “Cocaine and A Flock of Seagulls.”  Ooo-kay.  Channeling the 80’s, already, hmmm?

CAST LIST:

Lord Illingworth – Andrew Batten

Caroline Pontefract – Gillian English

Miss Hester Worsley – Sophia Fabiilli

Mr. Kelvil, M.P. – James Graham

Lady Stutfield – Lindsey Higgs

Mrs. Arbuthnot – Áine Magennis

Frances, the maid – Kathleen Pollard

Gerald Arbuthnot – Nicholas Porteous

Mrs. Allonby – Paula Schultz

Farquhar, the butler – Daniel Staseff

Lady Hunstanton – Renee Stein

Archdeacon Daubeny – Jason Thompson

Sir John Pontefract – Michael Vitorovich

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Auditions in October for “A Woman of No Importance”

Auditions will be held right after Thanksgiving (Canadian, that is) for Alumnae Theatre’s January production of the classic Oscar Wilde comedy A Woman of No Importance.  Director Paul Hardy plans to give the original – which was set in the 1890’s – a “modernist take”.  And yes, British accents are essential.  One can’t do Wilde without the accent, dahling!

Audition dates are Tuesday Oct 9, Wednesday Oct 10, and Thursday Oct 11.  Actors will be seen between 6-10pm.

To book a slot, please call 416-364-4170 and select Box 3, or e-mail GoAlumnae@gmail.com

For preparation, please have a 2-minute contemporary comedic monologue and be prepared to read from the script.  (You can check it out in advance at the Toronto Reference Library – go to the Performing Arts Desk on 5thfloor to request it.)  Of course, you must bring a résumé and a head shot to your audition.  Callbacks will be held Monday Oct 22 and Tuesday Oct 23, between 6-10pm also.  Auditions and performances will be at Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley Street in Toronto.

“A Woman of No Importance” by Oscar Wilde. Directed by Paul Hardy.
Alumnae Theatre, January 25 – February 9, 2013.
Poster design by Suzanne Courtney for Ticking Time Bomb Productions.

 Oscar Wilde’s play paints a portrait of the opulent rich and their ironic existential foils. Lord Illingworth is an (im)proper unmarried English gentleman whose ambitions and fortune have found him in the company of the upper-crust of the British country gentry. His young assistant Gerald is thrilled that the two will soon be travelling the world!! But everything is not as it seems….

ROLES

Lord Illingworth – mid 30’s.  Confirmed bachelor, sophisticated gentleman, womanizer.
Sir John Pontefract – mid 30’s and up.  Lady Caroline’s well trained husband.
Lord Alfred Rufford – mid 30’s and up.  A gentleman of leisure, and debtor extraordinaire.
Mr. Kelvil, M.P. – mid 30’s.  Bible-thumping politician and social climber.
The Ven. Archdeacon Daubeny, D.D.  – late 40’s.  A slightly daft preacher.
Gerald Arbuthnot – 18.  A headstrong young man, assistant to Lord Illingworth.
Farquhar, the butler  – any age.  Barely competent help.
Francis, a footman   -any age.  Exceptionally competent help.
Lady Hunstanton – mid 30’s and up.  The hostess; one cool classy lady.
Lady Caroline Pontefract – mid 30’s and up.  A witty and fun lady; close friend of Lady Hunstanton.

Lady Stutfield – mid 30’s and up.  A “charming” single lady.
Mrs. Allonby – mid 30’s and up.  Aristocratic, playful, fun, and a little cruel.

Miss Hester Worsley – 18.  An idealist young American; reluctant aristocrat.
Alice, a maid  – any age.  Mrs Arbuthnot’s help.
Mrs. Arbuthnot – mid 30’s.  Gerald’s mother, a pious and strong willed woman.

 By the way, this is a non-union, non-paying engagement.

Get more info on Alumnae Theatre Company’s proud history, current season lineup, and director’s bio at http://www.alumnaetheatre.com/mediadownloads/1213press-season.pdf

The notice is also available at http://www.alumnaetheatre.com/audit.html

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DIRECTORS STILL NEEDED FOR TWO SHOWS in Alumnae Theatre’s 2012/2013 Season

Missed the original deadline?  You can submit a proposal to direct either of these two plays:


“February” by Lisa Moore   (September 21 – October 6, 2012)

Based on her acclaimed novel of the same name, Lisa Moore’s play February is the story of Helen, a Newfoundlander whose husband, Cal, was killed in the Ocean Ranger Disaster in 1982. February is about moving forward, about never letting go and about doing the right thing. Its characters are vivid and wonderful and the story is as funny as it is sad. Alumnae Theatre’s production will be the Toronto premiere – a new version of the script, based on a workshop in March 2012.

“A Woman of No Importance” by Oscar Wilde (January 25 – February 9, 2013)

A classic Oscar Wilde comedy: England, late 1890’s – a man, a woman, and the child they had outside of marriage (oh, my!). Lord Illingworth has employed young Gerald as his new secretary. But when Gerald’s mother, Mrs. Arbuthnot, meets her son’s new boss they immediately recognize each other from their youthful days of indiscretion. Will Gerald learn his father’s true identity? What of Lord Illingworth? And how will Mrs. Arbuthnot live with the result?

 
DEADLINE:         Monday May 21st, 2012
INTERVIEW DATE:     Wednesday May 23rd between 7:00pm and 9:30pm. Location TBA.
SCRIPTS:        Reading copies are available at Theatre Ontario and at the           Toronto Reference Library, 5th floor, Performing Arts Desk.
February is also available as a digital file. Please contact Tabitha     Keast (TabithaKeast@sympatico.ca) for a copy.

TO APPLY:    Please submit an e-letter of interest to TabithaKeast@sympatico.ca by May 21st.      We’ll need you to submit via email a full written proposal and your resume by Tuesday May 22nd so that we can review it before your interview.  At the interview you will present the proposal to the Directors’ Selection Committee outlining your ideas for a full production. A template detailing what a Director’s     proposal includes is available upon request.

Reminder: This is a non-Equity/ACTRA and non-paying engagement.

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