Tag Archives: The Lady’s Not For Burning

In memoriam: Ed Rosing

A lovely tribute to a talented theatre artist. Bon voyage, Ed.

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SAMSUNG Ed Rosing – during a break in scenic painting on The Lady’s Not For Burning at Alumnae Theatre

Ed Rosing

March 11, 1929 – September 12, 2016

Ed Rosing (aka Eddie, Eduardo) was a creative soul with a quick, sharp wit, and a great love of classical music, opera and theatre. He played piano, was an original founding member of Cabbagetown Theatre, and worked as a respected interior decorator (into his late 80s, he still had two clients!), as well as a theatre set and lighting designer, scenic artist and director.

2013-12-30-16-01-05 Ed and Cody Boyd, working on the lighting for The Lady’s Not For Burning at Alumnae Theatre

I met Ed at Alumnae Theatre and got to know him during a production of Lady Windermere’s Fan, where he was the lighting designer and I was playing Cecil Graham. His gorgeous lighting plot included a gradual sunset during the opening scenes…

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September 19, 2016 · 3:34 pm

A delightful crush fest of summer love – Amicus Productions’ A Month in the Country

Sounds wonderful! Many of the cast have previously appeared on Alumnae Theatre stage – most recently Chris Coculuzzi and Carol McLennan in The Lady’s Not For Burning (January 2014). Other familiar names include Kathleen Jackson Allamby (February) and Zvi Gilbert (Homeward Bound).
A Month in the Country director Maureen Lukie was a delightfully flustered Mrs. Bennet in Alumnae’s 2009 production of Pride & Prejudice, with real-life spouse James Lukie as Mr. Bennet.

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A month in the country Spent a delightful afternoon at the Papermill Theatre at Todmorden Mills yesterday for a matinée performance of Amicus Productions’ A Month in the Countr y (Ivan Turgenev, translated by Constance Garnett and adapted by Christopher Douglas), directed by Maureen Lukie.
Family, friends and household staff feel the heat – and, in most cases, not just the seasonal temperature – at the country home of Natalya and Arkady. Secret love and repressed feelings bubble to the surface, creating a chaotic mess of dramatically comic proportions during a series of surprises, confessions and emerging rivalries.
Lukie has an excellent cast, consistently strong across the board, for this comedy of love. Kathleen Jackson Allamby is lovely as Natalya; conflicted, bored and adored, equal parts caged lioness and spider spinning. Chris Coculuzzi gives a stand-out performance as Mihail, sharp-witted with an equally pointed tongue, all the while simmering with a desperate love for his…

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Photo shoot with Lisa MacIntosh

Former bloggergal for Alumnae Theatre, Cathy McKim (also a scenic artist, most recently for The Lady’s Not For Burning in January; AND an actor – Wit and Lady Windermere’s Fan, among others) had a photo shoot in the Studio.

life with more cowbell

Had so much fun on Saturday, spending the early afternoon with photographer Lisa MacIntosh and makeup artist Rebecca Kupferstein up in the Studio at Alumnae Theatre for my white tie and tails vintage photo shoot.

Inspired by Lisa’s shoot with actress Kate Drummond, who sported a fab vintage look, as well as my experience playing Cecil Graham in Alumnae’s production of Oscar Wilde’s Lady Windermere’s Fan several years ago, I decided to go with a period look as a male impersonator, in white tie and tails. For the makeup, we were inspired by Julie Andrews as Victor in Victor/Victoria.

Here are some select pics from the shoot. Thanks so much to Lisa and Rebecca for their beautiful work!

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April 15, 2014 · 11:15 pm

A world on a stage – scenic work on The Lady’s Not For Burning @ Alumnae Theatre

Scenic artist Cathy McKim’s slideshow: a fascinating look at The Lady’s Not For Burning set painting in progress.  It takes a village to make a production, for sure!  The shot of the cast & director sitting onstage was taken at the post-matinee Talkback on February 2.

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Hey all –

As promised, here’s the slideshow extravaganza of the work for my recent scenic artist gig on Alumnae Theatre’s production of The Lady’s Not For Burning (designed by Ed Rosing).

Shouts to:

Building crew: Master carpenter Mike Peck, with additional construction by Cody Boyd, Paul Cotton, Gord Peck, Ed Rosing and Mike Vitorovitch.

Painting crew: Scenic artist (me), with Cody Boyd, Razie Brownstone, Joan Burrows, Margot Devlin, Ed Rosing and Dorothy Wilson.

The Lady’s Not For Burning is in its final week on the Alumnae mainstage, running tonight (Wed, Feb 5) through Saturday, February 8 at 8:00 p.m.

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February 5, 2014 · 4:28 pm

“The Lady’s Not For Burning” Talkback, Feb 2

Lady's Not For Burning cast

Cast of “The Lady’s Not For Burning”. BACK ROW:
Chris Coculuzzi (Thomas), Ian Orr (Matthew Skipps), Christopher Kelk (Mayor Tyson), Rob Candy (Tappercoom), Paul Cotton (Humphrey), Chris Whidden (Richard).
FRONT ROW: Andrea Brown (Jennet), Elsbeth McCall (Alizon), Carol McLennan (Margaret), Peter Higginson (The Chaplain).
NOT PICTURED: Ryan Armstrong (Nicholas).  Photo:  Dahlia Katz

As is traditional on the second Sunday of the run, yesterday’s matinee of The Lady’s Not For Burning was followed by a Talkback.  About a third of the audience stuck around for an informative Q&A with director Jane Carnwath, sound designer Angus Barlow, set & lighting designer Ed Rosing, and of course the cast.  Costume designer Margaret Spence was unfortunately not able to make it.  The Q&A was hosted by one of the producers, Barbara Larose.  Scenic artist Cathy McKim took pictures of the set which will soon go up on her blog as a slideshow, and of course I will re-blog for Alumnae.  Following is a sort-of transcript of the questions and answers during the approx 30-minute Talkback.

 Q:           It’s mentioned in the press release that Jane has loved The Lady for a long time.  Can you tell us why?

A:            Director JANE CARNWATH – It was instinctive – before I knew better!  I heard the recording of the original production – 1949?  1950?  [according to my research it was actually 1948 – bloggergal] which starred John Gielguid as Thomas and Pamela Brown as Jennet, and fell in love with the language.  At first I wanted to play Jennet, and then as time went on and that became unlikely, I wanted to play Margaret [the mayor’s sister, mother of Humphrey and Nicholas].  And then when that didn’t happen, I decided I wanted to direct it. Why do I love it?  I love the themes of hope and the possibility of redemption, and I love the characters.

Q:           The language shifted from almost Shakespearean to modern.  Was that in the script?

A:            Director JANE CARNWATH – Yes.  Christopher Fry wrote the play just after World War II, and the language is full of intentional anachronisms.  Fry states that the period is 1400, “either more or less or exactly” – he’s not very concerned about it.  We decided to just do a tip of the hat to the period, and not worry about exact period accuracy.

Q:           There are a lot of doors and exits – was that specified in the script, or a production decision?

A:            Set Designer ED ROSING –  It was necessary!  People are constantly going and coming through doors and windows.  The concept for the set was a house built around a stone room, like a church.  That’s why you’ll see the walls are stone on the inside.  In those days, fabric was used as insulation – we went a step further and put fabric on the walls.  The set in the original production was very Gothic – church-like with lots of arches.  I never forgot that original, but wanted this set to be much more humble and down-to-earth.        [bloggergal’s note:  in the original 1948 production in London’s West End, a then-unknown Richard Burton played Richard, the mayor’s clerk!]         

 Q:           To the actors, what was it like, working with this text?

A:            CHRIS COCULUZZI (Thomas) – I’ve done a lot of Shakespeare over the last 20 years.  This was more challenging!   Maybe because Fry’s language is not so much a part of our culture and consciousness as Shakespeare’s is.

A:            CAROL McLENNAN (Margaret) – They key for me was I found it was essential to e-nun-ci-ate!  You can’t just garble it all together – it has to be understandable to the audience when they hear it for the first time.  Even now we’re still finding things. When I first read for Jane, she said “You were very natural – this play isn’t.”

A:            PAUL COTTON (Humphrey) – Jane insisted we get the language down first, then work on making it natural after.  Which is a reversal of the usual process.

A:            ANDREA BROWN (Jennet) – It’s a journey and a quest with every performance!  The challenge was how to honour the beautiful and poetic language while making it engaging to the audience.

Q:           The cast did a great job in getting the comedy across.

A:            IAN ORR (Matthew Skipps) – This is a comedy??!!

Q:           I noticed in her bio that Andrea has now played an accused witch in two shows.

A:            ANDREA BROWN – Yes, I played Elizabeth Proctor in The Crucible just a few months ago.  Spoiler alert: it does not end well for her!  Jennet has a much happier ending.

Q:           (Jane calls the audience’s attention to the sound design)

A:            Sound Designer ANGUS BARLOW – There are about 25 sound cues.  Some are so subtle, it’s like Margot [stage manager Margot Devlin] calls the cue and nothing happens.  We can’t hear it in the booth, but it’s audible to the audience.  It was a challenge to build and run the sound.  We recorded some of the cast to make the noises of the angry mob and the party, and a professional cellist was brought in to record the awful sounds of the viol tuning [actor Peter Higginson, who plays the musically untalented Chaplain, interjects: “it wasn’t me!”].

Q:           It’s a big cast [11 actors] – was everybody at all the rehearsals?

A:            Director JANE CARNWATH – No, we had a few reads all together and then I broke the script into scenes and tried to bring actors in only when they would be used.   When we finally get to run all the scenes together it takes a huge leap forward.  This was one of the best teams I’ve ever worked with – a lot happened onstage; the actors made it come together.  I had a great time with the production because I was also working with people I’ve worked with before – Ed, Angus, Margaret, Margot… it’s been wonderful.

The Lady’s Not For Burning runs to Saturday Feb 8.  Four more performances:  Wed – Sat at 8pm.  Tickets are 2-for-1 on Wed, and $20 Thu – Sat (unless you purchase day-of tickets at half price at the T.O. Tix booth!).  reservations@alumnaetheatre.com

 

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Playing Big Maggie is a ‘mental and physical’ challenge

After Alumnae Theatre Company’s The Lady’s Not For Burning closes, the Main Stage at 70 Berkeley Street will be home February 20 – March 8 to the Toronto Irish Players’ production Big Maggie.

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Amicus Productions’ “Scotland Road” opens Jan 30 at Papermill Theatre

No, it’s not an Alumnae production, but there’s a company member and several friends-of involved!  Plus we’re cross-promoting with our current show, The Lady’s Not For Burning.

Director Victoria Shepherd posted on her Facebook page yesterday:

Tech dress was almost flawless.  Favourite moments? [Lighting designer] Jamie Sample [who worked on Alumnae’s  New Ideas Festival a few years ago] punching the air triumphantly when a cue worked, and [composer/sound designer] John Stuart Campbell directing his cues from the audience and raising his arms triumphantly when the sound was perfect. Well called, [stage manager] Steve Minnie. Two more sleeps – can’t wait!

Scotland RdScotland Road opens Thursday Jan 30 and runs to Feb 8 at the Papermill Theatre (Todmorden Mills).  That’s down the hill – near Broadview station, if you’re taking transit.   For info & ticket purchasing, see  http://www.amicusproductions.ca

 

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